Newsletter Database

141 articles found.
The government signed an annex to the Basic Collective Agreement for public servants and a wage s... [more]

The government signed an annex to the Basic Collective Agreement for public servants and a wage supplement agreement for education sector employees. The annex to the Basic Collective Agreement for public servants was signed by the Labour and Pension System Minister and representatives of nine trade unions. The wage supplement agreement for education sector employees was signed by the Science and Education Minister and education union representatives. As a consequence of the agreement, during this government’s term salaries in state administration and public services will have gone up 18.3% by October 2020.

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Croatian teachers are still on strike. Their demands have so far either gone unheard or have been... [more]

Croatian teachers are still on strike. Their demands have so far either gone unheard or have been met with unsatisfactory ‘solutions’ from the side of the Croatian Government. The views of the Croatian teachers and their unions and the Croatian Government and their offer on the table have not shifted at all. The unions insist on a 6.11% increase in the coefficient.

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Teachers are expanding an ongoing strike, making it nationwide in their demand for higher wages. ... [more]

Teachers are expanding an ongoing strike, making it nationwide in their demand for higher wages. The strike has been (partially) ongoing since last month, with classes halted in certain municipalities on particular days. Unions said they are now launching a nationwide strike and that they also plan street protests. The teachers’ strike is supported by 47 trade unions out of solidarity and because they believe that defending the education sector is a priority.

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Teachers in primary and secondary education have been on strike demanding a decent pay rise, whic... [more]

Teachers in primary and secondary education have been on strike demanding a decent pay rise, which recognises the high workload and complexity of the profession. The EU trade union for education ETUCE stands on solidarity with the Croatian member organisations and supports their fair demand for a salary increase of on average 6.11% for all employees in primary and secondary education.

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Croatia backed down on changes to its pension system as parliament reinstated a retirement age of... [more]

Croatia backed down on changes to its pension system as parliament reinstated a retirement age of 65 after leading trade unions staged protests against a rise to 67. Like many European countries, Croatia has an aging population, and parliament approved a government proposal in December to raise the retirement age to 67 from 2033 instead of 2038 as previously planned, for both men and women. It also aimed to trim pensions for people who retire early.

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The Croatian government has agreed to return the retirement age to 65, just months after raising ... [more]

The Croatian government has agreed to return the retirement age to 65, just months after raising it to 67, following a campaign supported by hundreds of thousands of citizens. The Prime Minister said that the government had listened to citizens and was revising the law accordingly, but further changes would make it possible for Croatians to continue working after the age of 65 should they choose to do so. The increase in the retirement age — which would have come into force from 2033 for both men and women — is part of the government’s plans to reform the pension system in response to the country’s ageing population.

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Some 1,500 teachers from all across Croatia held a protest rally to demand higher wages in the ed... [more]

Some 1,500 teachers from all across Croatia held a protest rally to demand higher wages in the education system. Organizers said they had strong support for their demands and that there were just 1,500 of them present because that is the number of persons who can gather in St Mark’s Square, which is where the Croatian government is located. After the speeches, the Prime Minister received the protest organizers to discuss their demands, which is for wages in education to rise by an index of 6.11 per cent.

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Health unions were due to meet the government to continue negotiations over the current collectiv... [more]

Health unions were due to meet the government to continue negotiations over the current collective agreement and previously agreed pay increases. The unions are threatening strike action if there is not a positive outcome and confirmation that pay increases included in the current collective agreement will be honoured. Pay increases of 3% (in August) for health workers in general and 4% (in October) for staff with diagnostic responsibilities are part of the annex to the collective agreement in force until 31 October. However, the government said it wouldn't confirm the increases, leading to an angry response from the unions and the current negotiations.

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Rules to bolster the rights of unemployed people, an increase in the maternity leave allowance, a... [more]

Rules to bolster the rights of unemployed people, an increase in the maternity leave allowance, a potential referendum on the statutory pension age and the government’s new national reform programme are the main topics of interest in this Eurofound note. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in the second quarter of 2019. According to data from the Croatian Pension Insurance Institute, the number of insured employed persons exceeded 1.6 million at the end of July and reached the figure of 1,600,405. This means that compared to pre-recession July 2008, when the figure stood at 1.639 million, there are only 39,000 insured persons less.

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Labour shortages have become an acute problem in the youngest member state of the EU. After the c... [more]

Labour shortages have become an acute problem in the youngest member state of the EU. After the country’s accession to the EU in 2013 workers got free access to better paid jobs in western Europe which caused a brain-drain. Another cause for the shortage lies in the (too) early retirements. These were used as a means to buy social peace after the breakup of Yugoslavia and the privatization of many state-owned companies. Now employers recruit more foreign workers to fill vacancies. These come from the countries of the former Yugoslavia, but the suggestion is to look for workers in India, Pakistan and the Philippines. The trade union movement opposes this easy attraction of foreign workers and suggests to pay higher wages in better, long-term contracts.

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