Newsletter Database

216 articles found.
The CITUB and Podkrepa union confederations have decided to pull out of the National Council for ... [more]

The CITUB and Podkrepa union confederations have decided to pull out of the National Council for Tripartite Cooperation, as a protest against what they claim is the government's persistent failure to honour its commitments and in support for demands for "honest pay". The two confederations warned that ordinary workers must not be left bearing the brunt alone for the global financial crisis. They are demanding a tangible increase in the national minimum wage (CITUB earlier called for a 18.2% hike from 1 January 2009) and 20% pay rises in the public sector. (See also this Collective Bargaining Newsletter Year 1 No.'s 7 and 8).
(English: Watson Wyatt Data Services, New Industrial Relations Europe, 11/2008; http://www.bnr.bg/RadioBulgaria/Emission_English/News/1211-B17.htm, via http://www.labourstart.org/cgi-bin/show_news.pl?country=Bulgaria)

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Though in the national budget a 9% rise of the national minimum wage from 1 January 2009 is envis... [more]

Though in the national budget a 9% rise of the national minimum wage from 1 January 2009 is envisaged (up by 9% to BGN 240 or Euro 120 per month), the CITUB union confederation is calling for a 18.2% hike. If CITUB gets its way, the new minimum wage rate would become BGN 260 (Euro 130). CITUB put forward its claim in recent discussions between trade unions, employers' associations and the Socialist Party, the dominant faction in the coalition movement. (See also this Collective Bargaining Newsletter Year 1 No. 7).
(English: Watson Wyatt Data Services, New Industrial Relations Europe, 10/2008)

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The national minimum wage is due to go up by 9% to BGN 240 (Euro 120) a month from 1 January 2009... [more]

The national minimum wage is due to go up by 9% to BGN 240 (Euro 120) a month from 1 January 2009 under the terms of next year's draft budget, presented by the government to employers' associations and trade unions for their comments. The package also envisages a possible new approach to public sector pay increases, with a 10% increase in over-all wages rather than across-the-board rises for individuals. That will allow awards scheduled for 1 July 2009 to be linked more closely to personal performance. The government proposes a net cut in total social insurance charges of 2.4%-points, with reductions in employer contributions to the wage guarantee fund and to pensions, and an increase in the combined healthcare contribution from 6% to 8%. The draft forecasts economic growth in 2009 of 6.5% and inflation of 4.2%.
(English: Watson Wyatt Data Services, New Industrial Relations Europe, 8/2008)

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On 4 June, Bulgarian Health Minister Evgeni Zhelev signed a new collective agreement with five he... [more]

On 4 June, Bulgarian Health Minister Evgeni Zhelev signed a new collective agreement with five health trade unions, including the Federation of Trade Unions in Health Services and Podkrepa Medical Federation, that increases wages for health workers by 90 to 100%. The signing of the agreement comes before the discussions on the 2009 government budget and after the mass strikes of 2007 in the education and health care sectors. The increase will take effect on 1 July 2008, and will cover hospitals in state and municipal ownership, as well as hospitals operating as joint stock-holdings. The agreement is the first in a series of steps aimed at converging the salaries of Bulgarians to those elsewhere in the EU in an effort to stop the brain drain.
(English: http://www.world-psi.org/Template.cfm?Section=Home&CONTENTID=20506&TEMPLATE=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm)

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Employees of the two Czech-based CEZ Bulgaria power plants scored a small but significant victory... [more]

Employees of the two Czech-based CEZ Bulgaria power plants scored a small but significant victory. On April 11, an agreement was signed to end the strike that had started two days earlier between with the company's management and the strike committee formed by the Confederation of Independent Trade Unions in Bulgaria (CITUB) and the Confederation of Labour `Podkrepa'. Over three-quarters of all employees had joined the strike. According to the agreement, CEZ agreed to increase workers' average wages, back-dated to January 1 2008, by 22.6%. Basic wages would be increased in 2008 by 24.97% and by a 6% wage bonus, reaching 698 leva (Euro 356) per month, and in 2009 with the 2008 inflation rate plus a minimum of 2%points, and a 12% wage bonus.CEZ employees earning less than the company average will receive higher salary increases. Initially, in early March, CEZ management offered a 20% pay rise. Management claimed that the originally envisaged cut of 400 staff would actually cover less than 200 CEZ employees. Individuals who are laid off will receive four to 14 months gross pay.
(English: Watson Wyatt Data Services, New Industrial Relations Europe, 4/2008; http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/eiro/2008/04/articles/bg0804029i.htm)

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Bulgarian trade unions threatened to call a general strike in spring if the country's parliament ... [more]

Bulgarian trade unions threatened to call a general strike in spring if the country's parliament passes a controversial amendment bill that would severely curtail the unions' rights to strike. The threat came from the chairman of KNSB, one of Bulgaria's two union confederations after a meeting with labour ministry officials and representatives of the Socialist party, the senior partner in the ruling coalition, and was supported by the chairman of the other major confederation, Podkrepa.
Te amendments, authored by four Socialist MPs, would severely curtail unions' power to call strikes, requiring all labour disputes to go through an arbitration court with the labour ministry. The two confederations are demanding new legislation to establish the right to bargain collectively and to go on strike in compliance to international labour standards.
(English: Watson Wyatt Data Services, New Industrial Relations Europe, 1/2008; http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=89185)

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